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Food Day
Littlebrook loves Food Day! On October 23, we will once again come together to celebrate the harvest from our thriving garden education program.  At 1:10 pm, all 350 K-5 students will stream outside to sample dishes made from crops that they grew, harvested (and this year mainly prepared) in the school's courtyard garden. This event marks the culmination of the gardening season at our school and a perfect example of how garden education is yet another vehicle for curricular connections and environmental stewardship.

The children will be tasting a wide range of dishes including onion biscuits, pickled citron melon, apple and pear butter and pumpkin cornbread.  Some examples of our cooking projects:  

The Kindergartners, who study vining plants, have continued their annual tradition of making refrigerator pickles in class, this year exploring pickled green tomatoes and pickled radishes. ickling came to a screeching stop when one table shouted, "My tomatoes are floating but the radishes are sinking!"  Lots of scientific observations ensued!  

The second graders are looking forward to a special treat: Celeriac ice cream generously donated by The Bent Spoon and made from the celeriac the children grew in the school garden and parsley and kale pesto they've made themselves.  Many second graders were leery about harvesting the celeriac and parsley as they knew many larva depended on these plants for food. A quick check with their classmates assured them that the larva had eaten their fill and were well on their way (as butterflies) to find warmer climates or pupas waiting for warmer temperatures.    

The fifth grade, as part of their Freedom Garden study, will be preparing and eating sweet potato cornbread and frittatas made from okra, collards and peppers. They learned that the food traditions of enslaved people brought to this country are an important part of our history.
The children will be tasting a wide range of dishes including onion biscuits, pickled citron melon, apple and pear butter and pumpkin cornbread.  Some examples of our cooking projects:  The Kindergartners, who study vining plants, have continued their annual tradition of making refrigerator pickles in class, this year exploring pickled green tomatoes and pickled radishes.  Pickling came to a screeching stop when one table shouted, "My tomatoes are floating but the radishes are sinking!"  Lots of scientific observations ensued!  The second graders are looking forward to a special treat: Celeriac ice cream generously donated by The Bent Spoon and made from the celeriac the children grew in the school garden and parsley and kale pesto they've made themselves.  Many second graders were leery about harvesting the celeriac and parsley as they knew many larva depended on these plants for food.  A quick check with their classmates assured them that the larva had eaten their fill and were well on their way (as butterflies) to find warmer climates or pupas waiting for warmer temperatures.    The fifth grade, as part of their Freedom Garden study, will be preparing and eating sweet potato cornbread and frittatas made from okra, collards and peppers.   They learned that the food traditions of enslaved people brought to this country are an important part of our history.  


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